Social Media + The Job Search

From searching to applying and beyond, social media has infiltrated into just about every aspect of the employment process for college students. Savvy students can use social media to leverage connections and find opportunities. However, students that don’t take personal responsibility on their social media accounts can find themselves in hot water. Employers often look at applicants’ accounts and students must be cognizant of the brand they portray online. 

Keri Betters and Natalie Hines, both interns with the Center for Career Services and Social Media Ambassadors, know all about the aforementioned topic. At this week’s spring career fair, students dusted off their blazers, proofread their resumes and headed down to the Bob to meet with recruiters. Thanks to the #UDSpringFair hashtag, the fair played out in real time on social media. See some of the buzz from the fair, as well as words of wisdom from Keri and Natalie, below. 

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Many students find it hard to fathom a world without social media, myself included. Since we are in the “age of the millennial,” using social media is no longer an excuse to hide behind a digital screen, but instead it has become a skill necessary to achieving professional success. Employers today look at LinkedIn and Twitter profiles for confirmation on a potential employee instead of relying strictly on the resume. Think of social media as the first impression; being aware of what social media says about you can affect your job hunt experience. Ways to use social media to your advantage: Follow and tweet prospective companies on Twitter and Facebook, find professionals on LinkedIn and introduce yourself, and research the company before an interview to have an understanding of what the company is all about. Social media is more than just a way to unwind from a stressful day. If used strategically, it can be a resource to landing the job of your dreams.” - UD student Keri Betters

Beyond the suit and tie, the freshly pressed blazer and the extra resume copies, there are several other ways a college student can prepare for the internship process, including social media. A simple tweet mentioning a company can spark an online relationship that could lead to an interview or a new professional connection on LinkedIn. Often, social media serves as a first impression. You, as a college student, are making an impression in the world of social media with every post, like and tweet. Do your Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and blog reflect the real you or the person you aspire to be? Professionals are constantly searching on the Internet for professionally branded and knowledgeable students. If you have the chance to impress employers in addition to the traditional interview, why not jump start your future via social media?” - UD student Natalie Hines